I am NOT a developer…and I am ok with that

One of the perks of my job is I get to meet some really smart and interesting people. I am grateful that many of them keep in touch and challenge me to think differently. For years now I have had conversations with some of these people around our careers and the future of our industry. What follows are some thoughts from those conversations.

Over the two decades I have served many roles in IT. I have supported mainframe, linux, and windows systems, I have been a storage engineer, a DBA, an IT Architect, a technology consultant, and for a couple years in college, I tried my hand at software development. Those lessons were invaluable, and I am very thankful I was given those opportunities.

Looking at the landscape of IT, we are constantly asked to do more with less. The role of the IT Operator is becoming less and less relevant in favor of IT Administrators. There seems to be a push, as automation and management software becomes more efficient, to again up level those administrator functions, move them closer to the end user, eliminate more of the middle. With OpenStack, developers want, and often are getting more access to infrastructure, albeit virtual infrastructure.

Considering the Google and Facebook models, it becomes apparent that while we are not going to see the end of the IT Administrator/Engineer any time soon, it is a good time to increase our skills. I am not a developer, and I have no intention of changing that. I understand code, and I can write well enough for a few utility apps, but it is not my passion. As I look at the IT landscape though, the future of our profession, in my opinion, belongs to developers, and those who understand code well enough to talk to developers with some level of intelligence about platforms, and infrastructure in terms that matter to them.

I have no crystal ball, but I have been in the industry long enough to say for certain that software is the future. Darwin said, “It is not the strong who survive but the adaptable”. It is up to us to adapt, we are writing the future of our industry, it is time to join the movement and be a part of something bigger. That said, I am not a developer and I am ok with that.

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I am NOT a developer…and I am ok with that

Communities are a messy thing

A couple months ago, I wrote a post about VMUG being community event, not a vendor fair. That sparked some discussion, but not the desired outcome of more community involvement. Long before I was a VMware employee, I was a member of the VMUG. Before that I was a member of the technical community. I write posts like this, show up to VMUG events, put this out on twitter, not because I am a VMware employee, not just because I think we have really cool technology, but because I believe the tech community is the reason for us being here, it is a part of us, and it is what I care about.

One of the greatest values in the community is comparing notes, asking questions, learning from each other. My challenge is to create micro community gatherings. Gatherings of similar companies. We are trying to create a healthcare community meetup, basically an opportunity for healthcare providers to discuss what works, or just hang out and meet their peers. I would also like to see other similar groups started, and I would love to come hang out and learn from all of you. It doesn’t have to be limited to companies who do the same thing as you, but similar sized companies are a great source of information.

Please come to the VMUG events, they are a great time, and I enjoy meeting those of you in my local area, but don’t let it end there. Small meetups are a great way to interact, after all, the IT community isn’t so large, and we all have something to contribute.

Communities are a messy thing

VMware vSphere: Design Workshop [V5.5] in Seattle!

Just a quick note, we were able to secure a VMware vSphere design workshop in Kirkland, WA, January 20th – 22nd. ┬áThis is an interactive course on design best practices, generally geared at VMware, but the concepts translate well to IT Architecture in general. ┬áThis is a recommended course for the VCAP-DCD exam, so register here if you are interested.

As always contact me if you have questions and I can get you in touch with the right people if there are other questions.

VMware vSphere: Design Workshop [V5.5] in Seattle!